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  • Corey Lee Wilson

CLW Enterprises Submits Project Proposal for California's High Road Training Partnership (HRTP)



High-Tech Career Pathways in California’s Energy Storage System (ESS) Sector Project Proposal

On July 1, 2022, CLW Enterprises submitted a proposed project to the California High Road Training Partnership (HRTP) for an on-line introductory career path education program providing workforce development for entry level energy storage systems (ESS) jobs in California in the commercial, industrial, and public-sector as-built environment.

Skilled and in high demand labor, such as licensed electricians in California, earn salaries comparable to 4-year college graduates and an overwhelming majority of them come from the desired HRTP target populations such as veterans, youth, immigrants/refugees, residents of disadvantaged communities, low-income communities, underserved populations, communities of color, and unemployed individuals, helping to level the playfield of equity.

Employer driven opportunities are the key to successful workforce development programs, and expanding the knowledge base regarding high-tech career opportunities in energy storage systems (ESS) as a licensed electrician requires a reliable database and updated web portal listing all potential ESS employers and new energy savings opportunities as the ESS industry develops and builds momentum.

Our project will prioritize HRTP target populations such as veterans, youth, immigrants/refugees, residents of disadvantaged communities, low-income communities, underserved populations, communities of color, and unemployed individuals at the high school, community college, and vocational school sectors where the greatest positive impact can be made by creating partnerships with likeminded community based organizations who work extensively with these populations.

Our proposed project will provide an active list of available financial aid sources and resources to assist eager candidates that can help sustain their training period and follow thru to successful employment and career advancement.

With the adoption, implementation, and expansion of ESS and the electrical jobs needed to expand this industry sector throughout California’s public, commercial, and industrial building stock and the increased capacity of the electrical workforce pipeline, our project can help lead the way in energy use reduction, zero net energy building compliance, and do so efficiently and effectively within the HRTP workforce development parameters.

How Much Do Licensed Electricians Earn in California?

The range of master electrician salaries can be wide. In California, a senior electrician in the 10th percentile earns $57,100, while one in the 90th percentile makes $83,700—a difference of more than $13 an hour. The average salary in California for a graduate with a high school diploma is $51,798.

The average Electrician I salary in California is $58,621 as of June 28, 2022, but the range typically falls between $51,110 and $68,048. The average Electrician II salary in California is $72,200, but the range typically falls between $63,197 and $81,752. The average Electrician III salary in California is $77,125, but the range typically falls between $68,407 and $87,125.

Salary ranges can vary widely depending on the city and many other important factors, including education, certifications, additional skills, the number of years you have spent in your profession. The salary figures above are per June 28, 2022, and the combined median salary for all 3 types of electricians in California is $70,784.

Strategically, ESS will be a key component to reaching the state’s ambitious goal of zero net energy (ZNE) by 2045 and will be poised to be a huge growth area (like solar was a decade ago) in the coming two decades.

Our project can help prime an applicable HRTP workforce development pipeline of eager candidates consisting of high school, community college, and vocational (trade) school students that lead to thousands of high-road careers for skilled electrical workers, more sustainable buildings, and lower energy usage and carbon emissions.

Image courtesy of Honeywell Process Solutions.

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